OccupyList.org global directory of occupations, media & links: Look up, to get contact!

 

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occupations, media & links

http://occupylist.org/index.php?option=com_jreviews&view=category&Itemid=101

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The Global Occupy-Manifest: We are living in a world controlled by forces incapable of giving freedom and dignity to the world’s population. This is a worldwide global spring. We will be there and we will fight until we win. We will not stop being people. We are not numbers. We are free women and men. For a global spring! For global democracy and social justice!

Occupy News

We are living in a world controlled by forces incapable of giving freedom and dignity to the world’s population. A world where we are told “there is no alternative” to the loss of rights gained through the long, hard struggles of our ancestors, and where success is defined in opposition to the most fundamental values of humanity, such as solidarity and mutual support. Moreover, anything that does not promote competitiveness, selfishness and greed is seen as dysfunctional.

But we have not remained silent! From Tunisia to Tahrir Square, Madrid to Reykjavik, New York to Brussels, people are rising up to denounce the status quo. Our effort states “enough!”, and has begun to push changes forward, worldwide.

This is why we are uniting once again to make our voices heard all over the world this 12 May.

We condemn the current distribution of economic resources whereby only a tiny minority escape poverty and insecurity, and future generations are condemned to a poisoned legacy thanks to the environmental crimes of the rich and powerful. “Democratic” political systems, where they exist, have been emptied of meaning, put to the service of those few interested in increasing the power of corporations and financial institutions.

The current crisis is not a natural accident; it was caused by the greed of those who would bring the world down, with the help of an economics that is no longer about management of the common good, but has become an ideology at the service of financial power.

We have awakened, and not just to complain! We aim to pinpoint the true causes of the crisis, and to propose alternatives.

The statement below does not speak on behalf of everyone in the global spring/Occupy/Take the Square movements. It is an attempt by some inside the movements to reconcile statements written and endorsed in the different assemblies around the world. The process of writing the statement was consensus-based, open to all, and regularly announced on our international communications platforms. It was a hard and long process, full of compromises; this statement is offered to people’s assemblies around the world for discussions, revisions and endorsements. It is a work in progress.

We do not make demands from governments, corporations or parliament members, which some of us see as illegitimate, unaccountable or corrupt. We speak to the people of the world, both inside and outside our movements.

We want another world, and such a world is possible:

1. The economy must be put to the service of people’s welfare, and to support and serve the environment, not private profit. We want a system where labour is appreciated by its social utility, not its financial or commercial profit. Therefore, we demand:• Free and universal access to health, education from primary school through higher education and housing for all human beings. We reject outright the privatisation of public services management, and the use of these essential services for private profit.

• Full respect for children’s rights, including free childcare for everyone.

• Retirement/pension so we may have dignity at all ages. Mandatory universal sick leave and holiday pay.• Every human being should have access to an adequate income for their livelihood, so we ask for work or, alternatively, universal basic income guarantee.

• Corporations should be held accountable to their actions. For example, corporate subsidies and tax cuts should be done away with if said company outsources jobs to decrease salaries, violates the environment or the rights of workers.

• Apart from bread, we want roses. Everyone has the right to enjoy culture, participate in a creative and enriching leisure at the service of the progress of humankind. Therefore, we demand the progressive reduction of working hours, without reducing income.

• Food sovereignty through sustainable farming should be promoted as an instrument of food security for the benefit of all. This should include an indefinite moratorium on the production and marketing of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and immediate reduction of agrochemicals use.

• We demand policies that function under the understanding that our changing patterns of life should be organic/ecologic or should never be. These policies should be based on a simple rule: one should not spoil the balance of ecosystems for simple profit. Violations of this policy should be prosecuted around the world as an environmental crime, with severe sanctions for those convicted.

• Policies to promote the change from fossil fuels to renewable energy, through massive investment which should help to change the production model.

• We demand the creation of international environmental standards, mandatory for countries, companies, corporations, and individuals. Ecocide (wilful damage to the environment, ecosystems, biodiversity) should be internationally recognised as a crime of the greatest magnitude.

2. To achieve these objectives, we believe that the economy should be run democratically at all levels, from local to global. People must get democratic control over financial institutions, transnational corporations and their lobbies. To this end, we demand:• Control and regulation of financial speculation by abolishing tax havens, and establishing a Financial Transaction Tax (FTT). As long as they exist, the IMF, World Bank and the Basel Committee on Banking Regulation must be radically democratised. Their duty from now on should be fostering economic development based on democratic decision making. Rich governments cannot have more votes because they are rich. International institutions must be controlled by the principle that each human is equal to all other humans – African, Argentinian or American; Greek or German.

• As long as they exist, radical reform and democratisation of the global trading system and the World Trade Organization must take place. Commercialisation of life and resources, as well as wage and trade dumping between countries must stop.

• We want democratic control of the global commons, defined as the natural resources and economic institutions essential for a proper economic management. These commons are: water, energy, air, telecommunications and a fair and stable economic system. In all these cases, decisions must be accountable to citizens and ensure their interests, not the interests of a small minority of financial elite.

• As long as social inequalities exist, taxation at all levels should maintain the principle of solidarity. Those who have more should contribute to maintain services for the collective welfare. Maximum income should be limited, and minimum income set to reduce the outrageous social divisions in our societies and its social political and economic effects.

• No more money to rescue banks. As long as debt exists, following the examples of Ecuador and Iceland, we demand a social audit of the debts owed by countries. Illegitimate debt owed to financial institutions should not be paid.

• An absolute end to fiscal austerity policies that only benefit a minority, and cause great suffering to the majority.

• As long as banks exist, separation of commercial and financial banks, avoiding banks that are “too big to fail”.

• An end to the legal personhood of corporations. Companies cannot be elevated to the same level of rights as people. The public’s right to protect workers, citizens and the environment should prevail over the protections of private property or investment.

3. We believe that political systems must be fully democratic. We therefore demand full democratisation of international institutions, and the elimination of the veto power of a few governments. We want a political system which really represent the variety and diversity of our societies:• All decisions affecting all mankind should be taken in democratic forums like a participatory and direct UN parliamentary assembly or a UN people’s assembly, not rich clubs such as G20 or G8.

• At all levels we ask for the development of a democracy that is as participatory as possible, including non representative direct democracy .

• As long as they are practised, electoral systems should be as fair and representative as possible, avoiding biases that distort the principle of proportionality.

• We call for the democratisation of access and management of media. These should serve to educate the public, as opposed to the creation of an artificial consensus about unjust policies.

• We ask for democracy in companies and corporations. Workers, despite wage level or gender, should have real decision-making power in the companies and corporations they work in. We want to promote co-operative companies and corporations, as real democratic economic institutions.

• Zero tolerance of corruption in economic policy. We must stop the excessive influence of big business in politics, which is today a major threat to true democracy.

• We demand complete freedom of expression, assembly and demonstration, as well as the cessation of attempts to censor the internet.

• We demand respect for privacy rights on and off the internet. Companies and the government should not engage in data mining.

• We believe that military spending is politically counterproductive to a society’s advance, so we demand its reduction to a minimum.

• Ethnic, cultural and sexual minorities should have their civil, cultural, political and economic rights fully recognised.

• Some of us believe a new Universal Declaration of Human Rights, fit for the 21st century, written in a participatory, direct and democratic way, needs to be written. As long as the current Declaration of Human Rights defines our rights, it must be enforced in relation to all – in both rich and poor countries. Implementing institutions that force compliance and penalise violators need to be established, such as a global court to prosecute social, economic and environmental crimes perpetrated by governments, corporations and individuals. At all levels, local, national, regional and global, new constitutions for political institutions need to be considered, as in Iceland or in some Latin American countries. Justice and law must work for all, otherwise justice is not justice, and law is not law.

This is a worldwide global spring. We will be there and we will fight until we win. We will not stop being people. We are not numbers. We are free women and men.

For a global spring!

For global democracy and social justice!

Take to the streets in May 2012!

http://occupythe99percent.com/2012/05/may-12th-globalmay-statement/

 

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Striking Miners accuse police, that they have tortured them in the prison! Police Killing of Africans, now torture-claims! What has changed since the time of Steve Biko? – But nevertheless the strike gets stronger! More then 90 percent are striking and now two Trade Unions overcome their division at Lonime: NUM now also supports the demand to bring salaries up from 400 to 1200 Euro per month. NUM President, Senzeni Zokwana, recently undertook a mission to Canada to study the salary grading of mineworkers. “Following this study, I can say that the amount that rock drillers are earning is far less than the extremes they are exposed to.” OccupyThinkTank: According to the General Declaration of Human rights, workers have worldwide, in South Africa as in Canada, the right to get for the same work the same salary! (Universal Declaration off Human Rights, Article 23. (1) Everyone has the right to work, to free choice of employment, to just and favourable conditions of work and to protection against unemployment. (2) Everyone, without any discrimination, has the right to equal pay for equal work.)

Torture Bill to be reviewed amid Lonmin mine workers’ allegations

Tuesday 4 September 2012 19:11

SABC

The Human Rights Committee says allegations of torture in police custody on Lonmin miners prove the urgency of proper legislation on this issue.

The Prevention and Combatting of Torture of Persons Bill is currently in process. Submissions on the Bill were made in the public hearings of the Portfolio Committee on Justice and Constitutional Development, today.

“It was the torture of Steve Biko that gave the impetus for the drafting of the convention against torture as South Africa’s most famous torture victim’s brutal death had sent shock-waves around the world,” says Lesireka Letsebe of Lawyers for Human Rights.

In recent weeks, miners arrested during the Marikana shootings alleged that they were being tortured by police officers in the holding cells. This signals that the issue of torture in custody that occurred 35 years ago has not gone away.

Torture has always been a crime

Today, the Human Right’s Commission expressed its horror to Parliament. South Africa currently has no law aimed specifically at combatting torture, even though the country is a signatory to this United Nations convention.

One submission suggested that the Bill be implemented retrospectively to the date of signature in December, 1998.

“We are not creating a new crime. Torture has always been a crime. Members of the public are still shocked that torture is not a crime,” says Kathleen Hardy from the University of the Witwatersrand’s Center for Applied Legal Studies.

Another presentation asked for police to be held liable when victims of continuous domestic abuse are not protected properly. MPs will now deliberate on submissions and how they can be incorporated into the legislation.

http://www.sabc.co.za/news/a/fe9272804c992dc68432c7c0652eb92f/Torture-Bill-to-be-reviewed-amid-Lonmin-mine-workers-allegations-20120409

NUM supports talks around the R12 500 wage demand

Tuesday 4 September 2012 16:21

Frank Nxumalo

The National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) supports the miner’s R12500 wage request(SABC)

The National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) says it will support talks around platinum miners’ demands for a R12 500.

The demand is at the centre of a four-week-old illegal and violent strike by platinum mine workers at Lonmin’s Marikana, in the North Westprovince, that culminated in the death of 34 of their colleagues.

“We do not have any objections and we cannot say it is too much. If workers say this is what will satisfy us, so be it. The issue is for Lonmin mine management to decide,” says NUM General Secretary, Frans Baleni.

“We cannot say it is too much, it is up to mine to say whether they can afford such a demand.”

NUM President, Senzeni Zokwana, recently undertook a mission to Canada to study the salary grading of mineworkers.

“Following this study, I can say that the amount that rock drillers are earning is far less than the extremes they are exposed to. It has been companies that have refused to entertain workers’ demands. If this demand can be looked at, NUM will consider it,” says Zokwana.

Peace talks have not deadlocked: Lonmin

Tuesday 4 September 2012 05:48

SABC

Lonmin mine workers have embarked on a crippling wage strike

Lonmin mine workers have embarked on a crippling wage strike. (SABC)

Management at the Lonmin mine in Marikana have denied reports that there is a stalemate in its peace negotiations with stakeholders. The talks have been postponed to today.

The department of labour and the CCMA have failed to convince the majority of miners to go back to work. Only 4% of the 28 000 strong force have reported for duty. The strikers say they want their wage issues to be addressed first.

Yesterday, trade union AMCU did not attend the latest round of talks, saying it had been sidelined. The union walked out of the negotiations at the Rustenburg Civic Centre on two occasions last week. Mine management says not all strikers are employed by the mine and it wants this to be investigated.

Meanwhile, the case against the arrested Marikana mineworkers has been postponed to February next year. The National Prosecuting Authority provisionally withdrew murder and attempted murder charges against them. 162 of the 270 miners were released yesterday after spending three weeks in various holding cells.

They were arrested when police shot and killed 34 of their colleagues. Their relatives celebrated their arrival with a cleansing ceremony.

The miners say they will remain steadfast in their demand for a R12 500 salary. The charges they are now facing include illegal possession of dangerous weapons, illegal possession of firearms and public violence. The remaining miners that are still in custody are expected to be released on Thursday.

The NPA meanwhile says murder charges could be re-instituted once investigations have been completed.

http://www.sabc.co.za/news/a/d3f162804c97983ea398a7675e0faabc/Peace-talks-have-not-deadlocked:-Lonmin-20120409

PREAMBLE

Whereas recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world,

Whereas disregard and contempt for human rights have resulted in barbarous acts which have outraged the conscience of mankind, and the advent of a world in which human beings shall enjoy freedom of speech and belief and freedom from fear and want has been proclaimed as the highest aspiration of the common people,

Whereas it is essential, if man is not to be compelled to have recourse, as a last resort, to rebellion against tyranny and oppression, that human rights should be protected by the rule of law,

Whereas it is essential to promote the development of friendly relations between nations,

Whereas the peoples of the United Nations have in the Charter reaffirmed their faith in fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person and in the equal rights of men and women and have determined to promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom,

Whereas Member States have pledged themselves to achieve, in co-operation with the United Nations, the promotion of universal respect for and observance of human rights and fundamental freedoms,

Whereas a common understanding of these rights and freedoms is of the greatest importance for the full realization of this pledge,

Now, Therefore THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY proclaims THIS UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS as a common standard of achievement for all peoples and all nations, to the end that every individual and every organ of society, keeping this Declaration constantly in mind, shall strive by teaching and education to promote respect for these rights and freedoms and by progressive measures, national and international, to secure their universal and effective recognition and observance, both among the peoples of Member States themselves and among the peoples of territories under their jurisdiction.

Article 1.

  • All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights.They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.

Article 2.

  • Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status. Furthermore, no distinction shall be made on the basis of the political, jurisdictional or international status of the country or territory to which a person belongs, whether it be independent, trust, non-self-governing or under any other limitation of sovereignty.

Article 3.

  • Everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of person.

Article 4.

  • No one shall be held in slavery or servitude; slavery and the slave trade shall be prohibited in all their forms.

Article 5.

  • No one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.

Article 6.

  • Everyone has the right to recognition everywhere as a person before the law.

Article 7.

  • All are equal before the law and are entitled without any discrimination to equal protection of the law. All are entitled to equal protection against any discrimination in violation of this Declaration and against any incitement to such discrimination.

Article 8.

  • Everyone has the right to an effective remedy by the competent national tribunals for acts violating the fundamental rights granted him by the constitution or by law.

Article 9.

  • No one shall be subjected to arbitrary arrest, detention or exile.

Article 10.

  • Everyone is entitled in full equality to a fair and public hearing by an independent and impartial tribunal, in the determination of his rights and obligations and of any criminal charge against him.

Article 11.

  • (1) Everyone charged with a penal offence has the right to be presumed innocent until proved guilty according to law in a public trial at which he has had all the guarantees necessary for his defence.
  • (2) No one shall be held guilty of any penal offence on account of any act or omission which did not constitute a penal offence, under national or international law, at the time when it was committed. Nor shall a heavier penalty be imposed than the one that was applicable at the time the penal offence was committed.

Article 12.

  • No one shall be subjected to arbitrary interference with his privacy, family, home or correspondence, nor to attacks upon his honour and reputation. Everyone has the right to the protection of the law against such interference or attacks.

Article 13.

  • (1) Everyone has the right to freedom of movement and residence within the borders of each state.
  • (2) Everyone has the right to leave any country, including his own, and to return to his country.

Article 14.

  • (1) Everyone has the right to seek and to enjoy in other countries asylum from persecution.
  • (2) This right may not be invoked in the case of prosecutions genuinely arising from non-political crimes or from acts contrary to the purposes and principles of the United Nations.

Article 15.

  • (1) Everyone has the right to a nationality.
  • (2) No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his nationality nor denied the right to change his nationality.

Article 16.

  • (1) Men and women of full age, without any limitation due to race, nationality or religion, have the right to marry and to found a family. They are entitled to equal rights as to marriage, during marriage and at its dissolution.
  • (2) Marriage shall be entered into only with the free and full consent of the intending spouses.
  • (3) The family is the natural and fundamental group unit of society and is entitled to protection by society and the State.

Article 17.

  • (1) Everyone has the right to own property alone as well as in association with others.
  • (2) No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his property.

Article 18.

  • Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief, and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his religion or belief in teaching, practice, worship and observance.

Article 19.

  • Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.

Article 20.

  • (1) Everyone has the right to freedom of peaceful assembly and association.
  • (2) No one may be compelled to belong to an association.

Article 21.

  • (1) Everyone has the right to take part in the government of his country, directly or through freely chosen representatives.
  • (2) Everyone has the right of equal access to public service in his country.
  • (3) The will of the people shall be the basis of the authority of government; this will shall be expressed in periodic and genuine elections which shall be by universal and equal suffrage and shall be held by secret vote or by equivalent free voting procedures.

Article 22.

  • Everyone, as a member of society, has the right to social security and is entitled to realization, through national effort and international co-operation and in accordance with the organization and resources of each State, of the economic, social and cultural rights indispensable for his dignity and the free development of his personality.

Article 23.

  • (1) Everyone has the right to work, to free choice of employment, to just and favourable conditions of work and to protection against unemployment.
  • (2) Everyone, without any discrimination, has the right to equal pay for equal work.
  • (3) Everyone who works has the right to just and favourable remuneration ensuring for himself and his family an existence worthy of human dignity, and supplemented, if necessary, by other means of social protection.
  • (4) Everyone has the right to form and to join trade unions for the protection of his interests.

Article 24.

  • Everyone has the right to rest and leisure, including reasonable limitation of working hours and periodic holidays with pay.

Article 25.

  • (1) Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and of his family, including food, clothing, housing and medical care and necessary social services, and the right to security in the event of unemployment, sickness, disability, widowhood, old age or other lack of livelihood in circumstances beyond his control.
  • (2) Motherhood and childhood are entitled to special care and assistance. All children, whether born in or out of wedlock, shall enjoy the same social protection.

Article 26.

  • (1) Everyone has the right to education. Education shall be free, at least in the elementary and fundamental stages. Elementary education shall be compulsory. Technical and professional education shall be made generally available and higher education shall be equally accessible to all on the basis of merit.
  • (2) Education shall be directed to the full development of the human personality and to the strengthening of respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms. It shall promote understanding, tolerance and friendship among all nations, racial or religious groups, and shall further the activities of the United Nations for the maintenance of peace.
  • (3) Parents have a prior right to choose the kind of education that shall be given to their children.

Article 27.

  • (1) Everyone has the right freely to participate in the cultural life of the community, to enjoy the arts and to share in scientific advancement and its benefits.
  • (2) Everyone has the right to the protection of the moral and material interests resulting from any scientific, literary or artistic production of which he is the author.

Article 28.

  • Everyone is entitled to a social and international order in which the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration can be fully realized.

Article 29.

  • (1) Everyone has duties to the community in which alone the free and full development of his personality is possible.
  • (2) In the exercise of his rights and freedoms, everyone shall be subject only to such limitations as are determined by law solely for the purpose of securing due recognition and respect for the rights and freedoms of others and of meeting the just requirements of morality, public order and the general welfare in a democratic society.
  • (3) These rights and freedoms may in no case be exercised contrary to the purposes and principles of the United Nations.

Article 30.

  • Nothing in this Declaration may be interpreted as implying for any State, group or person any right to engage in any activity or to perform any act aimed at the destruction of any of the rights and freedoms set forth herein.

http://www.un.org/en/documents/udhr/index.shtml

Posted in occupy Africa, Occupy against torture, occupy workersrights | Leave a comment

Im Kongo kommen immer mehr Menschen ums Leben – im Kampf um die Kontrolle der rohstoffreichen Regionen sind bereits viele Millionen gestorben! Kongolesen beklagen mit diesem Video dass, die Welt nicht darüber erfährt! Die Medien schweigen, die Industrieländer verdienen und die Warlords! Eine Radikalisierung der Verdammten dieser Erde wird kommen! Noch ist es Zeit, zusammen Wege der Kooperation und Solidarität zu finden und die Täter in Afrika und den feinen Büros der Industriestaaten zu stoppen! Machen wir Kongo zum Thema! Ausgebeutet von Diktatoren, ausgeblutet durch Kriege und Kolonialherrschaft: Die Geschichte des Kongo ist die exemplarische Katastrophe Afrikas.

Sorge um die Kleinsten: Auch aus Ruanda berichten Hilfsorganisationen von einer...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6MA7G4r5Eb0&feature=youtu.be

weiter Infos:

KongoTausende Kinder fliehen vor Zwangsrekrutierung

Junge Flüchtlinge in Afrika: Allein über die Grenze

Fotos
REUTERS

Entwicklungshelfer schlagen Alarm: Aus Angst vor einem Einsatz als Soldaten flüchten immer mehr Kinder aus dem Kongo in die angrenzenden Länder. Oft schlagen sich die Minderjährigen allein durch – und landen krank und unterernährt in Notlagern.

Info

Addis Abeba – Rettungsorganisationen in Afrika stellen einen beunruhigenden Trend fest. In der Demokratischen Republik Kongo sind laut der Kinderhilfsorganisation World Vision Tausende Kinder auf der Flucht. Sie versuchen so, einer Zwangsrekrutierung durch Rebellengruppen und dem Missbrauch als Soldaten zu entgehen.

ANZEIGE

In dem zentralafrikanischen Krisenland würden immer wieder Kinder entführt und gezwungen, für bewaffnete Gruppen und Militärs zu kämpfen. Deshalb überquerten zahlreiche junge Menschen mittlerweile ohne ihre Familien und auf sich allein gestellt die Grenzen in die Nachbarländer Ruanda undUganda.

“Viele junge Menschen, die hier in den Flüchtlingslagern in Uganda ankommen, sind unter 15 Jahre alt. Sie wurden von ihren Eltern getrennt und wissen nicht, wie sie überleben sollen”, sagte Stewart Katwikirize von World Vision Uganda.

Auch aus Ruanda berichten Hilfsorganisationen von einer zunehmenden Zahl von Kindern, die in den Camps eintreffen. Viele von ihnen seien krank und unterernährt und benötigten dringend medizinische Hilfe, hieß es. Mehrere Kinder seien bereits gestorben.

“Wir wissen, dass vor kurzem fast 200 Kinder von bewaffneten Gruppen entführt und gezwungen wurden, sich den Kämpfen anzuschließen”, erklärte Dominic Keyzer, ein Mitarbeiter von World Vision im Kongo. Viele Kinder hielten sich seither in den Wäldern in Nord-Kivu im Osten des Landes versteckt.

In der Region war es in den vergangenen Monaten wieder verstärkt zu Gewaltausbrüchen gekommen. Regierungstruppen kämpfen dabei gegen Anhänger des früheren Rebellenführers Bosco Ntaganda, der vom Internationalen Strafgerichtshof in Den Haag unter anderem wegen Massenvergewaltigungen und des Einsatzes von Kindersoldaten gesucht wird. Weit über 100.000 Menschen sind seit April auf der Flucht.

Konys Miliz entführt fast 600 Kinder

ANZEIGE

Immer wieder kommt es in Zentralafrika zu Fällen von Zwangsrekrutierung Minderjähriger. Internationales Aufsehen erregte zuletzt der Rebellenführer Joseph Kony. Mit seiner Miliz Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) verbirgt sich dieser seit Jahren im Grenzgebiet von Uganda, Kongo und Südsudan. Inzwischen läuft eineinternationale Jagd auf den mutmaßlichen Massenmörder, doch in dem kaum zugänglichen Gebiet entkommt Kony seinen Häschern immer wieder.

Trotz der jahrelangen Flucht gelingt es der LRA offenbar noch immer, im großen Stil Kinder zu entführen und als Soldaten zu missbrauchen. Im Juni war das Ergebnis einer Uno-Untersuchung bekannt geworden. Demnach wurden zwischen Juli 2009 und Februar 2012 mindestens 591 Kinder aus der Demokratischen Republik Kongo, der Zentralafrikanischen Republik und dem Süden Sudans entführt.

Die entführten Kinder werden als Kindersoldaten, Spione, Wächter, Träger und Köche eingesetzt. Häufig werden sie gezwungen, enge Angehörige und Freunde umzubringen. Nach aktuellen Erkenntnissen verfügt Kony noch über 300 bis 500 bewaffnete Kräfte, rund die Hälfte davon seien Kindersoldaten, so der Uno-Bericht.

Dokumentation: Im Schatten des Bösen – Der Krieg gegen die Frauen im Kongo:

Bilder: http://www.spiegel.de/fotostrecke/junge-fluechtlinge-in-afrika-allein-ueber-die-grenze-fotostrecke-85340-3.html

Filme zum Buch Schatten über dem Kongo des amerikanischen Professors Adam Hochschild anhand der geöffneten Regierungsarchieve in Belgien:

weitere neun Teile auf You tube!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T1Y0VrzmI8I&feature=relmfu

hier findet man sie.

Posted in occupy Africa, occupy peace | Leave a comment

Lonmin strikers urged not to retreat from their demands – African Peoples Convention (APC) leader Themba Godi has urged striking Lonmin workers not to retreat from their demands for salary increases. Godi was addressing close to 3 000 people at Wonderkop in Marikana in North West, the site where 34 miners were killed last month. He says should the workers go back to work without being granted the R12 500 salary that they want, this would be tantamount to betrayal of those workers killed by the police last month. Lonmine now promises, not to dismiss any of the striking workers, last week they still threatened to dismiss all workers, who do not come to work! A progress, but not enough, the workers have acooding to the General Declaration of Human Rights the right to get salaries, from which they can make a decent living

Lonmin strikers urged not to retreat from their demands

Tuesday 4 September 2012 12:52

SABC

 

African Peoples Convention (APC) leader Themba Godi has urged striking Lonmin workers not to retreat from their demands for salary increases. Godi was addressing close to 3 000 people at Wonderkop in Marikana in North West, the site where 34 miners were killed last month.

He says should the workers go back to work without being granted the R12 500 salary that they want, this would be tantamount to betrayal of those workers killed by the police last month.

Meanwhile, Lonmin mine management says it’s not planning to dismiss the striking workers who were arrested. The company says it respects the law and other processes. Lonmin spokesperson, Abey Kgotle, says they have not dismissed anyone, and are not about to dismiss anyone.

About 162 out of about 270 people were released yesterday after charges of murder against them were provisionally dropped by the Ga-rankuwa Magistrate’s court. The mine however says not all of them are its employees.

Posted in occupy Africa, occupy workersrights | Leave a comment

One quarter of Liberian land has been sold to logging companies in just two years, threatening the country with widespread devastation, according to a report. A new spate of logging contracts in Liberia – the most heavily forested country in west Africa – means that 40% of its forests are under private ownership and risk being flattened by logging companies, says the report. The report, by environmental watchdogs Global Witness, Save My Future Foundation and the Sustainable Development Institute, claimed PUPs had been given to private companies without consulting local groups and in some cases using forged documents. “People being defrauded out of their forest rights at this speed and scale is worrying in itself. When you look at who the forests have been given to, it gets even more alarming,” said Jonathan Gant, of Global Witness. “Giving your forests to companies like that is not a sustainable investment.”However, land reform – one of the issues identified by Liberia’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s final report as a cause of the war – has not yet happened, and is regarded as a threat to peace in the country.

Liberia has sold quarter of its land to logging companies, says report

Campaigners claim forests are under threat as landowners enter into deals with logging firms, bypassing sustainability laws

Liberia’s President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf has suspended the head of the Forestry Development Authority and launched an investigation into the sale of land to logging companies. Photograph: Issouf Sanogo/AFP/Getty

One quarter of Liberian land has been sold to logging companies in just two years, threatening the country with widespread devastation, according to a report.

A new spate of logging contracts in Liberia – the most heavily forested country in west Africa – means that 40% of its forests are under private ownership and risk being flattened by logging companies, says the report. Companies have used what campaigners describe as a legal loophole to buy unlimited swaths of private land with the intention of logging and clearing forests through the use of Private Use Permits (PUPs).

“Private Use Permits are great news for logging companies. They are very bad news for pretty much everybody else in Liberia,” said Robert Nyahn of Save My Future Foundation. “Some communities will receive less than 1% of their timber’s value, while very little revenue will reach state coffers.”

The report, by environmental watchdogs Global Witness, Save My Future Foundation and the Sustainable Development Institute, claimed PUPs had been given to private companies without consulting local groups and in some cases using forged documents.

“People being defrauded out of their forest rights at this speed and scale is worrying in itself. When you look at who the forests have been given to, it gets even more alarming,” said Jonathan Gant, of Global Witness. “Giving your forests to companies like that is not a sustainable investment.”

The contracts allow landowners to enter into agreements directly with logging companies, bypassing strict laws on sustainability and size limits. The groups behind the report also claim that land owned on behalf of communities has been given away with little or no consent, prompting suggestions that land deeds had been forged.

Liberia’s president, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, has announced she has suspended the head of the Forestry Development Authority, Moses Wogbeh, and launched an investigation.

“President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf has commissioned an independent body to conduct a comprehensive review of the policies and procedures regarding the issuance of PUPs,” said a statement from the office of the president last week.

Johnson Sirleaf – a former World Bank economist and Nobel prize laureate – has faced mounting allegations of corruption among senior officials in recent months. Last month, she suspended her son Charles Sirleaf from his position as deputy central bank governor after he failed to declare his assets to the country’s anti-corruption commission. Two of Johnson Sirleaf’s other sons continue to hold positions in government.

The new findings about the extent of PUPs will come as a further blow to Johnson Sirleaf’s leadership, campaign groups say, and undermine the reform to Liberia’s forestry sector since the end of the country’s 14-year resource-fuelled civil war in 2003, which was characterised by the use of timber exports by then-Liberian president Charles Taylor to finance arms.

Experts estimate that $30m (£18m) has been spent by donors to ensure a legal process for granting logging concessions since the end of Liberia’s war, and to help communities better manage their forest reserves.

A UN ban on Liberian logging was lifted in 2006, and the country resumed exports of timber in 2010 under new forestry regulation that drew praise from the international community.

However, land reform – one of the issues identified by Liberia’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s final report as a cause of the war – has not yet happened, and is regarded as a threat to peace in the country.

Liberians said that the reaction to news of the PUPs by Johnson Sirleaf and the Liberian Timber Association – a local trade association that has filed complaints with both the Liberian senate and supreme court – did not go far enough.

“Recent statements by President Johnson Sirleaf are promising, but the response of the Liberian Timber Association is a major concern,” said Silas Siakor, of the Sustainable Development Institute. “Too frequently, those who abuse Liberia’s natural resources have not been held to account. If Liberia’s forests and the people who depend upon them are not to be swallowed whole by Private Use Permits then the suspension of logging operations must stand this time and a comprehensive independent investigation must be undertaken.”

Global Witness said: “Since the end of Liberia’s war we have worked with the government and international partners like the United States, the EU and the World Bank to ensure the Liberian people get sustainable benefits from their forests. These Private Use Permits severely undermine these reform efforts.”

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/sep/04/liberia-sold-quarter-land-logging-companies

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Eurozone crisis live: Moody’s cuts European Union rating outlook to negative LIVEGermany, France, the UK and the Netherlands could stop fulfilling their obligations to the EU if the crisis worsens, Moody’s warns

Moody’s cuts EU credit rating outlook

Good morning, and welcome to our rolling coverage of Europe’s debt crisis.

Overnight, ratings agency Moody‘s has lowered its outlook on the European Union’s AAA rating to negative, from stable, which is the first step towards a full downgrade.

The decision reflects the growing pressures on the four biggest countries who fund the EU: Germany, France, Britain, and the Netherlands, who together provide almost half of the EU’s budget.

Should their economic situations worsen, Moody’s argues, they could be forced to prioritise their own debt obligations rather than their commitments to the EU.

All four countries are rated AAA with Moody’s, but have seen their outlook cut to negative in recent months as the eurozone crisis has rolled on.

Here are some highlights from Moody’s statement (online in full here):

http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2012/sep/04/eurozone-crisis-moodys-european-union-negative#block-5045a2ef58f923c82113b85b

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