UN envoy Brahimi: Not the West or the rebels can decide, that Assad has to leave office, that is the right of the Syrian people! He says he is not the representative of the rebels, but of the United Nations, who have the task to find a peaceful solutions. He has the hope, that on both sides some might leave the violent way and look for a peaceful solution! In the face of 20.000 dead people (alone 5000 in August), and the suffering of millions as refugees or destruction of their living conditions and the risk of escalation to a full war, he feels the big responsibility to act! The world should support him and object the aim of the west to bring Assad under all means down, even if it costs Millions of lives! And also the Assad Regime should be changed to a democracy, but according to the will of Syrians! Only Syrians have the right to choose their order and their government, not the big men, Obama, Hollande or Cameroon, who want to bring Syria down to prepare an attack on Iran and to weaken Russia and China!

UN envoy Brahimi says Syria mission ‘nearly impossible’

The new international envoy to Syria, Lakhdar Brahimi, tells Lyse Doucet why he is “scared” of his role

The new UN-Arab League envoy on Syria, Lakhdar Brahimi, has given a deeply pessimistic view of the task ahead of him, as he takes up his new post.

Speaking to the BBC, the Algerian described his mission as “nearly impossible”.

Mr Brahimi, a seasoned UN diplomat, was appointed after his predecessor, Kofi Annan, resigned, saying he no longer saw a way to fulfil his mission.

Fighting in Syria has escalated, despite a truce mediated by Mr Annan.

Activists say 20,000 people have died since the uprising against the Syrian government began last March.

On Sunday, the pro-rebel Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said more than 5,000 people were killed in August alone.

Continue reading the main story

Analysis

image of Lyse DoucetLyse DoucetChief International Correspondent, BBC News

Lakhdar Brahimi has embarked on one of the world’s toughest jobs.

But as one of the UN’s most experienced troubleshooters, he may offer the skills needed in a conflict where both sides seem to believe they have no choice but to fight to the end.

Mr Brahimi often deployed a “no victor, no vanquished” power-sharing approach in previous mediations, including the 1989 agreement that ended Lebanon’s 15-year civil war.

UN sources who have worked closely with Mr Brahimi over many years say he will be more involved in the minutiae of the process, engaging personally with all the key players, and drawing on his own extensive experience and contacts in the region and beyond, not to mention his understanding of Arab politics and language.

He plans to base his office in Damascus if possible, or in Cairo, and to spend as much time as possible in the region.

But for the time being, there is little optimism anywhere that much can be done. Even Mr Brahimi sees his job as keeping expectations low.

The conflict has increasingly come to resemble a full-scale civil war, forcing an estimated one million Syrians from their homes.

Last month, the United Nations wound up the observer mission that had been tasked with monitoring the ceasefire in Syria under the six-point peace plan negotiated by Mr Annan.

“I’m coming into this job with my eyes open, and no illusions,” Mr Brahimi told the BBC’s Lyse Doucet in an interview in New York.

“I know how difficult it is – how nearly impossible. I can’t say impossible – [it is] nearly impossible.

Our correspondent says that, with few people believing that Mr Brahimi can do much, it seems he sees his job as keeping expectations low.

Burden

A former Algerian foreign minister, Mr Brahimi has also held a series of key UN appointments, including that of UN envoy to Afghanistan and mediator of the peace deal that ended the Lebanese civil war.

Analysts say he has a formidable reputation at the UN and his appointment was widely welcomed.

But Mr Brahimi admitted to having some trepidation about his new mission, saying he could understand those frustrated with the lack of international action in Syria.

“I’m scared of the weight of responsibility. People are already saying: ‘People are dying and what are you doing?’

“And we are not doing much. That in itself is a terrible weight.”

Mr Brahimi said he had so far failed to see “any cracks” in the “brick wall” that had defeated Mr Annan – an “intransigent” Syrian government, escalating rebel violence and a paralysed UN Security Council, where China and Russia have vetoed several resolutions aimed at putting pressure on Damascus.

Syrians at the Za'atri refugee camp in Jordan on 30 August 2012A growing number of Syrians have fled abroad to escape the conflict

He said he would keep Mr Annan’s six-point peace plan – now seen by many as irrelevant – in his “tool box” for possible adaptation, but admitted he “had ideas, but no plan yet”, apart from talking to as many people as possible.

Addressing the Syrian government, he said the need for political change in Syria was “fundamental and urgent”, but – as he has previously – refused to be drawn on whether President Bashar al-Assad should step down, as the opposition and several Western leaders are demanding.

“Change cannot be cosmetic,” he said. “There will be a new order, but I do not know who will be the people in the order. That’s for Syrians to decide.”

He also sought to keep a distance between himself and the rebels, who have criticised him for his cautious stance.

“Please remember I am not joining your movement,” he said. “I am working for two international organisations, the United Nations and the Arab League, and I do not speak the same language as you.”

New fighting

Mr Brahimi’s comments to the BBC came after another day of violence inside Syria on Sunday.

Syria map

In the capital, Damascus, an explosion hit a district where major military and security compounds are located, reports say.

State TV described the blast – involving two bombs – as “terrorism” and said four people had been lightly injured.

Rebels and government forces have been involved in a fierce battle for Damascus since July.

The building affected was a base for officers guarding the joint chiefs of staff offices nearby but was empty at the time, officials said.

Bomb attacks in Damascus and the largest city, Aleppo, have become increasingly frequent in recent months, with the authorities often blaming them on “armed terrorist gangs”.

Are you in Syria? Send us your comments and experiences using the form below.

Send your pictures and videos to yourpics@bbc.co.uk or text them to61124 (UK) or +44 7624 800 100 (International). If you have a large file you can upload here.world-middle-east-19461173

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About ottwf

The capitalistic and imperialistic system and its systematic aims: profit and power over others, still dominates our world and not the aims of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, as 1948 agreed! After the world-economic-crisis after 1929 and the following World-War the world hat decided with agreeing the Universal Declaration of Human rights, to create a new world order; conflicts should be solved with peaceful means, not nations and their power, but the dignity of human beings around the world should be the aim of the policies and the economy, of every state and the community of states. But soon after the end of the war, when the victims and destruction were forgotten, all continued as before, with all risks, we had seen before. The split in rich an poor is getting bigger and bigger. We also overuse our global environment already, even if the big majority of mankind still lives in poverty! We are not victims, this world is men-made and be changed from men and women! It will be possible, if those, who do not want or serve (because of system-pressure) profits first, but want for themselves and everybody a life in human dignity unite and develop in a global base-democratic movement a common vision for our world, and learn, how to make this vision real. We need for it a big empowerment of many, many common men and women and their activities. Our chances are because of new communication technologies, of common languages, of the level of education and the mixture of people from different backgrounds better then ever. The occupy-movement is a good start for such a global movement. We support it and try to contribute to its success! We choose news and make comments and so try to unite people for an Occupy-Think-Tank: Its tasks: creating a news-network, self-education, working on global-reform programs and learning to organize projects for those, who are suffering. Join us, so that we can build teams for these aims for all subjects and countries as a base for the unification. We have Wan(n)Fried(en) in our name, because it means When peace and it is a modification of the name of the town our base is, in Wanfried, a small town in the middle of Germany, where we can use a former factory for our activities. Our telefon: 0049-5655-924981, mobil: 0171-9132149, email: occupy-think-tank@gmx.de
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