GERENAL WESLEY CLARK EXPLAINS HOW THE USA PLANS TO ATTACK SOME COUNTRIES. U.S.A LIKES TO GO WAR IN NAME OF THE PEACE AND CREATE MANY EXCUSES TO MAKE PEOPLE BELEAVE IN THEIR POLITICS..USA PLANNED TO ATTAK 7 COUNTRIES IN 5 YEARS.wmv

 

GERENAL WESLEY CLARK EXPLAINS HOW THE USA PLANS TO ATTACK SOME COUNTRIES. U.S.A LIKES TO GO WAR IN NAME OF THE PEACE AND CREATE MANY EXCUSES TO MAKE PEOPLE BELEAVE IN THEIR Imperialistic  POLITICS… REPRESENTED BY U.S.A

Video: 1383

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http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=267015426750326&set=a.219791058139430.48617.214527748665761&type=1&theater

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Human Rights Watch (HRW) has accused the US government of covering up the extent of waterboarding at secret CIA prisons, alleging that Libyan opponents of Muammar Gaddafi were subjected to the torture before being handed over to the former dictator’s security police. The report, Delivered into Enemy Hands: US-Led Abuse and Rendition of Opponents to Gaddafi’s Libya, also says that the CIA, Britain’s MI6 and other western intelligence services were responsible for “delivering Gaddafi his enemies on a silver platter” by sending the captured men to Tripoli for further abuse after the American interrogations. After four decades of dictatorship, Libya held its first national elections. Yet its transition into a law-respecting state has been bloody, with rights violations committed by all parties. Thousands of people are held in illegal detention facilities without any judicial process. Ill treatment, torture, and even killings in custody are a sad reality. Tens of thousands of displaced Libyans languish in camps around the country, many of whom have been unlawfully forcibly displaced from their homes. The transitional authorities, who ruled after Gadaffi’s fall, have failed to rein in the militias that de facto control the country, whose crimes have gone unpunished.

Human Rights Watch accuses US of covering up extent of waterboarding

The organisation alleges that opponents of Muammar Gaddafi were subjected to the torture at secret CIA prisons

Muammar Gaddafi

Human Rights Watch alleges that Libyan opponents of Gaddafi were subjected to torture at CIA prisons before being handed over to his security police. Photograph: Sipa Press/Rex Features

Human Rights Watch (HRW) has accused the US government of covering up the extent of waterboarding at secret CIA prisons, alleging that Libyan opponents of Muammar Gaddafi were subjected to the torture before being handed over to the former dictator’s security police.

The New York-based human rights group has cast “serious doubt” on Washington’s claim that only three people, all members of al-Qaida, were waterboarded in American custody, claiming in a new report to have fresh evidence that the CIA used the technique to simulate drowning on Libyans snatched from countries in Africa and Asia.

The report, Delivered into Enemy Hands: US-Led Abuse and Rendition of Opponents to Gaddafi’s Libya, also says that the CIA, Britain’s MI6 and other western intelligence services were responsible for “delivering Gaddafi his enemies on a silver platter” by sending the captured men to Tripoli for further abuse after the American interrogations.

The HRW report is based on documents seized at the Libyan intelligence headquarters after Gaddafi’s fall, and interviews with 14 former detainees, mostly members of the Libyan Islamic Fighting Group (LIFG), which attempted for 20 years to overthrow the former regime in Tripoli. The group joined last year’s revolution and some of those tortured by the US now hold leadership positions in the new Libyan administration.

Last week the US attorney general, Eric Holder, said that no one would be prosecuted for CIA abuses during the Bush administration’s “war on terror” despite the death of at least two detainees under torture. But HRW said the latest revelations merit new independent inquiries in the US and Britain. It said Washington’s failure to hold to account Americans responsible for torture undermines US demands for accountability for crimes by others in Syria and Libya.

Among those tortured was Khalid al-Sharif, who was held for two years in CIA-run detention centres in Afghanistan before being handed over to Gaddafi in 2005. He is now head of the Libyan National Guard.

“I spent three months getting interrogated heavily during the first period [in US custody] and they gave me a different type of torture every day. Sometimes they used water, sometimes not,” he told HRW. “Sometimes they put a hood over my head and they lay me down and they started to put water in my mouth … They poured the water over my mouth and nose so I had the feeling that I was drowning. I couldn’t breathe … I tried to turn my head left and right as much as I could to take in some gulps of breath. I felt as if I was suffocating.”

Sharif told HRW a doctor was present who would tell the interrogators when to stop the abuse and when to continue.

Detained alongside Sharif was Mohammed al-Shoroeiya. He told HRW he was waterboarded numerous times.

“He said he felt like each time lasted about three minutes but said there was no way to really tell time,” the HRW report states. “When told that the United States had admitted to doing this to a few people for between 20 and 40 seconds each time, he said he was sure his sessions were definitely longer than that.

“He said there were doctors present. He knows they were doctors because his leg was broken while he was there and he was treated by these same people. The doctors would monitor him as the cold water was poured on him, and when his body temperature got too low, they would order warm water be added to the cold. Once his temperature was okay, they would begin adding cold water again.”

HRW said the testimony contradicts assertions in Washington about who was subject to the drowning technique, which the Bush administration claimed was not torture.

“The allegations cast serious doubts on prior assertions from US government officials that only three people were waterboarded in US custody,” said HRW. “They also reflect just how little the public still knows about what went on in the US secret detention programme.”

The report contains documents, some of which it said are being made public for the first time, found abandoned in the offices of former Libyan intelligence chief, Moussa Koussa, after Gaddafi was overthrown.

“The documents include communications between Moussa Koussa’s office and the CIA, and between Koussa’s office and MI6,” the report said. “They show a high level of cooperation between the United States, the United Kingdom and the government of former Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi on the transfer of Gaddafi’s opponents into Libyan custody. The documents are significant because they shed light on the still opaque CIA renditions programme, identify former detainees by name, and provide corroborating evidence in several specific cases, most notably confirming the involvement of the US, the UK, and other governments.

“Ten of the 14 Libyans interviewed for this report were rendered back to Libya within about year of the date when Libya, the United States and the United Kingdom had formally mended their relations. The mending of relations was very publicly marked by a visit from the British prime minister at the time, Tony Blair, to Libya on 25 March, 2004. The collusion is ironic, given that years later these same governments would end up assisting Gaddafi’s opponents in their efforts to overthrow the Libyan leader. Several of those opponents are now in leadership positions and are important political actors in Libya.”

HRW said the treatment of the Libyans sheds light on the Bush administration’s failure to distinguish between Islamists responsible for the 9/11 attacks and “those who may simply have been engaged in armed opposition against their own repressive regimes”.

“This failure risked aligning the United States with brutal dictators and aided their efforts to dismiss all political opponents as terrorists,” it said.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/sep/06/human-rights-watch-us-waterboarding

human rights watch:

http://www.hrw.org/news/2012/09/05/us-torture-and-rendition-gaddafi-s-libya

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Peace accord signed at Lomnin, without an agreement on wages! Will the workers sign or continue to strike? The accord commits the strikers to return to work by Monday and the Lonmin mine to negotiate the workers R12 500 pay demand. The accord also states that peace should prevail during negotiations and that peace and stability at the mine should be restored. The Association of Mineworkers and Construction Union, AMCU, did not sign the peace accord, but their representatives were present. Miners say they will not go back to work until their demand for the salary-hike has been met. The chamber of mines believes the R12 500 salary demand by striking miners at Marikana is unreasonable. The miners are being supported by Methodist Minister Paul Verryn, a former anti-apartheid campaigner, who said their call to be paid 12,500 rand (1,200 euros) per month was fair. “I actually think by comparison towards what some people in this mine are earning, and some of the investors are earning from what is coming from this mine, R12.5 is reasonable,” he said.

Video: south-african-miners-defiant-over-pay-protest

Peace accord signed at Lomnin

Thursday 6 September 2012 05:35

SABC

A peace accord to find an amicable solution to the labour dispute at Lonmin’s Marikana mine was signed last night. The accord was signed by the Department of Labour, The National Union of Mineworkers and two other trade unions, UASA and Solidarity, at the Rustenburg Civic Centre in the North West province.

The Association of Mineworkers and Construction Union, AMCU, did not sign the peace accord, but their representatives were present. The accord commits the strikers to return to work by Monday and the Lonmin mine to negotiate the workers R12 500 pay demand.

Government mediation talks re-opened yesterday with the aim of ending the illegal strike action which has led to 44 deaths at the mine. The talks went on until midnight and the miners had already left the venue for home when the agreement was signed. The miners are yet to sign it.

The accord also states that peace should prevail during negotiations and that peace and stability at the mine should be restored.

The president of the trade union federation, Cosatu, says they are optimistic that the striking miners will sign the peace accord.

Once the peace accord has been signed by the striking mines a date will be set for negotiations to commence, which will be facilitated by the CCMA.

Once all the parties have signed, all the unions will be included in the existing wage agreement, including AMCU.

The president of the trade union federation, Cosatu, says they are optimistic that the striking miners will sign the peace accord.

Strike leaders are expected to analyse the peace accord and give feedback to the other miners this morning, near the Koppie where 34 of their colleagues were gunned down by police three weeks ago.

Chamber of mines defends Lonmin

Thursday 6 September 2012 11:08

SABC

The Chamber of Mines has come to the defence of Lonmin in the North West where ongoing strike action and violence have been occurring.

The chamber believes the R12 500 salary demand by striking miners at Marikana is unreasonable. Miners say they will not go back to work until their demand for the salary-hike has been met. The Chamber’s Vusi Mabena says the strike came at a time that the platinum sector is experiencing difficulties.

Mabena says the strike on its own is a great blow to the sector. He says rock-drill operators’ salary is R6 000 a month, not more than that.

“Demanding a take home salary of R12 500, they are basically asking for a gross salary of R20 000 and if you aceed to a demand like that for a rock driller, then you want to close the mine. The platinum industry was already going through difficult times when this strike came. We are looking at ways to cease the situation,” says Mabena.

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The world rembers the young South African Steve Biko, who was killed because he fought for a non-racistic world: Qutes: “So as a prelude whites must be made to realise that they are only human, not superior. Same with Blacks. They must be made to realise that they are also human, not inferior. The most potent weapon of the oppressor is the mind of the oppressed.”

South-Africa remembers Steve Biko

Thursday 6 September 2012 06:06

SABC

September marks Biko month, remembering his life and sacrifice to his country. South Africans are being urged to remember the struggle hero Steve Biko.

Steve Biko was the leader of  the black consciousness movement and an author. He was detained and tortured by the apartheid police in 1977 and later died at age 30, after suffering brain damage.

The foundation, keeping  his legacy alive says, young people can learn a lot from Biko. Director of the Biko Foundation, Obenewa Amponsah, says: “His writing were in his early years, this says to young people they can do something to change their own destiny and that of the country.”

To commemorate his life, special events will be held country wide. The Biko annual lecture will be delivered by renowned African poet and novelist Professor Ben Okri.

“His work turns to focus on culture, identity, heritage and how they relate to the development agenda so he is in the tradition of Biko,” says Amponsah on Okri.

A Biko multi-purpose center will be officially opened this month in King William’s Town.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JNmAcgdO2Ck

The most potent weapon of the oppressor is the mind of the oppressed.
Steven Biko

Being black is not a matter of pigmentation – being black is a reflection of a mental attitude.
Steven Biko

You are either alive and proud or you are dead, and when you are dead, you can’t care anyway.
Steven Biko

Merely by describing yourself as black you have started on a road towards emancipation, you have committed yourself to fight against all forces that seek to use your blackness as a stamp that marks you out as a subservient being.
Steven Biko

Black Consciousness is an attitude of the mind and a way of life, the most positive call to emanate from the black world for a long time.
Steven Biko

So as a prelude whites must be made to realise that they are only human, not superior. Same with Blacks. They must be made to realise that they are also human, not inferior.
Steven Biko

The basic tenet of black consciousness is that the black man must reject all value systems that seek to make him a foreigner in the country of his birth and reduce his basic human dignity.
Steven Biko

Black man, you are on your own.
Steven Biko

It becomes more necessary to see the truth as it is if you realize that the only vehicle for change are these people who have lost their personality.
Steven Biko

In time, we shall be in a position to bestow on South Africa the greatest possible gift – a more human face.
Read more at

http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/s/steven_biko.html#msHEzyeWOeTlSM8X.99

Steve Biko ( 1946-1977 ) est un militant noir d’Afrique du Sud. C’est l’une des grandes figures de la lutte anti-apartheid. Arrêté en août 1977, il est torturé puis transféré à Pretoria. Sa mort en prison souleva l’indignation internationale qui aboutit à la condamnation, à l’ONU, du régime sud-africain. Son meurtre est resté impuni.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ijb9auSQRso&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XurHTcTLY9k&feature=related

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The USA are still top: Nowhere are more people in prison! And there are people who benefit from it!

What part of this prison corporation of America don’t you understand?

“A new report from the reformist Justice Policy Institute concludes that private prison companies have not only benefited from increased incarceration, they have also helped fuel it.
According to Gaming the System: How the Political Strategies of Private Prison Companies Promote Ineffective Incarceration Policies, private prisons have increased their “market share” of the overall prison population. While the number of inmates over the past decade has risen 16 percent, the number in private federal facilities has risen 120 percent and the number in state facilities has risen 33 percent. Meanwhile, the two largest private prison operators, Correction Corporations of America and GEO Group (formerly Wackenhut), raked in a combined $2.9 billion in revenue in 2010.”

— with Mark E. Bryan, Danny Mills, Chuck Charliecharlez and Laird Racette.

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US-American Professor, Peace- and Democracy-activist, Noam Chomsky: Why America and Israel are the greatest threats to peace and not Iran

05 September 2012
Noam Chomsky
USA and the War on Terror

As the war drums are beating even louder, imagine the situation was reversed, and Iran — or any other country — did a fraction of what America and Israel do at will.


By Noam Chomsky
Alternet
3 September 2012


Video: If Iran had nuclear weapons most Arab people would feel safer.

IT IS NOT EASY to escape from one’s skin, to see the world differently from the way it is presented to us day after day. But it is useful to try. Let’s take a few examples.The war drums are beating ever more loudly over Iran. Imagine the situation to be reversed.

Iran is carrying out a murderous and destructive low-level war against Israel with great-power participation. Its leaders announce that negotiations are going nowhere. Israel refuses to sign the Non-Proliferation Treaty and allow inspections, as Iran has done.

Israel continues to defy the overwhelming international call for a nuclear-weapons-free zone in the region. Throughout, Iran enjoys the support of its superpower patron.

Iranian leaders are therefore announcing their intention to bomb Israel, and prominent Iranian military analysts report that the attack may happen before the US elections.

Iran can use its powerful air force and new submarines sent by Germany, armed with nuclear missiles and stationed off the coast of Israel. Whatever the timetable, Iran is counting on its superpower backer to join if not lead the assault. US defense secretary Leon Panetta says that while we do not favor such an attack, as a sovereign country Iran will act in its best interests.

All unimaginable, of course, though it is actually happening, with the cast of characters reversed. True, analogies are never exact, and this one is unfair – to Iran.

Like its patron, Israel resorts to violence at will. It persists in illegal settlement in occupied territory, some annexed, all in brazen defiance of international law and the UN Security Council. It has repeatedly carried out brutal attacks against Lebanon and the imprisoned people of Gaza, killing tens of thousands without credible pretext.

Thirty years ago Israel destroyed an Iraqi nuclear reactor, an act that has recently been praised, avoiding the strong evidence, even from US intelligence, that the bombing did not end Saddam Hussein’s nuclear weapons program but rather initiated it. Bombing of Iran might have the same effect.

Iran too has carried out aggression – but during the past several hundred years, only under the US-backed regime of the Shah, when it conquered Arab islands in the Persian Gulf.

Iran engaged in nuclear development programs under the Shah, with the strong support of official Washington. The Iranian government is brutal and repressive, as are Washington’s allies in the region. The most important ally, Saudi Arabia, is the most extreme Islamic fundamentalist regime, and spends enormous funds spreading its radical Wahhabist doctrines elsewhere. The gulf dictatorships, also favored US allies, have harshly repressed any popular effort to join the Arab Spring.

The Nonaligned Movement – the governments of most of the world’s population – is now meeting in Teheran. The group has vigorously endorsed Iran’s right to enrich uranium, and some members – India, for example – adhere to the harsh US sanctions program only partially and reluctantly.

The NAM delegates doubtless recognize the threat that dominates discussion in the West, lucidly articulated by Gen. Lee Butler, former head of the US Strategic Command: “It is dangerous in the extreme that in the cauldron of animosities that we call the Middle East,” one nation should arm itself with nuclear weapons, which “inspires other nations to do so.”

Butler is not referring to Iran, but to Israel, which is regarded in the Arab countries and in Europe as posing the greatest threat to peace In the Arab world, the United States is ranked second as a threat, while Iran, though disliked, is far less feared. Indeed in many polls majorities hold that the region would be more secure if Iran had nuclear weapons to balance the threats they perceive.

If Iran is indeed moving toward nuclear-weapons capability – this is still unknown to US intelligence – that may be because it is “inspired to do so” by the US-Israeli threats, regularly issued in explicit violation of the UN Charter.

Why then is Iran the greatest threat to world peace, as seen in official Western discourse? The primary reason is acknowledged by US military and intelligence and their Israeli counterparts: Iran might deter the resort to force by the United States and Israel.

Furthermore Iran must be punished for its “successful defiance,” which was Washington’s charge against Cuba half a century ago, and still the driving force for the US assault against Cuba that continues despite international condemnation.

Other events featured on the front pages might also benefit from a different perspective. Suppose that Julian Assange had leaked Russian documents revealing important information that Moscow wanted to conceal from the public, and that circumstances were otherwise identical.

Sweden would not hesitate to pursue its sole announced concern, accepting the offer to interrogate Assange in London. It would declare that if Assange returned to Sweden (as he has agreed to do), he would not be extradited to Russia, where chances of a fair trial would be slight.

Sweden would be honored for this principled stand. Assange would be praised for performing a public service – which, of course, would not obviate the need to take the accusations against him as seriously as in all such cases.

The most prominent news story of the day here is the US election. An appropriate perspective was provided by US Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis, who held that “We may have democracy in this country, or we may have wealth concentrated in the hands of a few, but we cannot have both.”

Guided by that insight, coverage of the election should focus on the impact of wealth on policy, extensively analyzed in the recent study “Affluence and Influence: Economic Inequality and Political Power in America” by Martin Gilens. He found that the vast majority are “powerless to shape government policy” when their preferences diverge from the affluent, who pretty much get what they want when it matters to them.

Small wonder, then, that in a recent ranking of the 31 members of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development in terms of social justice, the United States placed 27th, despite its extraordinary advantages.

Or that rational treatment of issues tends to evaporate in the electoral campaign, in ways sometimes verging on comedy.

To take one case, Paul Krugman reports that the much-admired Big Thinker of the Republican Party, Paul Ryan, declares that he derives his ideas about the financial system from a character in a fantasy novel – “Atlas Shrugged” – who calls for the use of gold coins instead of paper currency.

It only remains to draw from a really distinguished writer, Jonathan Swift. In “Gulliver’s Travels,” his sages of Lagado carry all their goods with them in packs on their backs, and thus could use them for barter without the encumbrance of gold. Then the economy and democracy could truly flourish – and best of all, inequality would sharply decline, a gift to the spirit of Justice Brandeis.

http://www.stopwar.org.uk/index.php/usa-war-on-terror/1839-noam-chomsky-why-america-and-israel-are-the-greatest-threats-to-peace

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